In what language does "senshi" mean "scout"?

busyprocrabating:

admiral-yousmator:

You know what really gets to me, and I’m sure many know this, is the blatant abuse and betrayal that white photogs display in POC countries. Every time a photo has gotten famous like this photo did in history, the actual focus of the photo is left behind in the dust while the white photog is hailed as a hero for displaying the ills of that country. He didn’t even fucking ask her name. He didn’t ask for 17 years. The world knew nothing about her life and her story. He captured one moment that made him famous and she got nothing.
Every time I see this photo, I seethe.

“Names have power, so let us speak of hers. Her name is Sharbat Gula, and she is Pashtun" [x]

busyprocrabating:

admiral-yousmator:

You know what really gets to me, and I’m sure many know this, is the blatant abuse and betrayal that white photogs display in POC countries. Every time a photo has gotten famous like this photo did in history, the actual focus of the photo is left behind in the dust while the white photog is hailed as a hero for displaying the ills of that country. He didn’t even fucking ask her name. He didn’t ask for 17 years. The world knew nothing about her life and her story. He captured one moment that made him famous and she got nothing.

Every time I see this photo, I seethe.

Names have power, so let us speak of hers. Her name is Sharbat Gula, and she is Pashtun" [x]

(Source: madfuture)

lilcochina:

Yet ppl don’t understand how white privilege still exists in brown n black countries

…oh.  Hm.
It seems somehow significant to me that Japan is one of the few orange countries, and the “weirdness” of Japan is a common topic of conversation among white Americans (myself included, on occasion).  That’s kind of a sobering thought.

lilcochina:

Yet ppl don’t understand how white privilege still exists in brown n black countries

…oh.  Hm.

It seems somehow significant to me that Japan is one of the few orange countries, and the “weirdness” of Japan is a common topic of conversation among white Americans (myself included, on occasion).  That’s kind of a sobering thought.

edgebug:

freshest-tittymilk:

glowinthedarkgirlfriend:

The Little Mermaid TV Series: Gabriella

Remember when Disney had a cute, disabled, poc mermaid?

When i was younger, one of my best friends was a deaf guyanese girl, and her fave princess was Ariel, mainly bc she related to her living without a voice (and her love of swimming)

When this episode aired, she cried and squawked and made sounds that were almost understandable… She saw herself as a mermaid, on tv, with her favourite character of all time

Representation matters, always, no matter what

okay it’s hella cool and they actually animated real ASL they didn’t just bullshit it oh mAN THIS IS LEGIT SIGN LANGUAGE AND IT’S ACTUALLY AWESOME A+++++++

Omg, AND she has a cute cephalopod friend as a translator!  BEST MERMAID EVER.

(Source: cornelia89)

deepdarkmarvellous:

lifeislikeabadrpg:

astrumsystema:

Excuse me but everyone needs to play Fallen London. Not only is it an amazing, totally non-combat game, but here are the gender options:

  • A lady
  • A gentleman
  • My dear sir, there are individuals roaming the streets of Fallen London at this very moment with the faces of squid! Squid! Do you ask them their gender? And yet you waste our time asking me trifling and impertinent questions about mine? It is my own business, sir, and I bid you good day.

Did they make the Orientalism go away?

They took an important step!

The Potato Salad Kickstarter, “Jokes” and Privilege

gradientlair:

I understand that the potato salad Kickstarter thing is supposed to be funny and reveal how silly people are and how any project can get funding (despite the many projects that I’ve seen created by people of colour not reach funding peak). But I don’t see this. I see privilege and people who already have resources getting more. I see myself creating (while plagiarized and demanded to offer free labor) and still struggling at times—and people can really save their breath about nonsensical meritocracy myths or anything similar because I have a long resume, skills, bla bla bla, so don’t even—but a potato salad fundraiser has raised almost the most that I have ever earned in an entire year. 

But…my point isn’t even about the aforementioned at the moment. 

Why is this kinda hurtful to me and not even remotely funny to me? Because when I tried to raise money for my brother who was brutally beaten last December (he’s doing a lot better now but is still healing), I received rape threats, death threats and dealt with Whites who contacted GoFundMe itself to shut my campaign down, calling me a liar, without any evidence whatsoever, solely because a Black woman was raising funds for a Black man. For medical help. Not potato salad. Medical help. Surgeries and physical therapy. Even if people didn’t donate to my campaign those months ago (and it’s closed now and page deleted; no need to reblog that campaign post), they didn’t have to threaten me and try to shut it down either. They could’ve ignored me.

Clearly this is not just about “people can do whatever they want with their money” or any similar rationale. And, I understand GoFundMe and Kickstarter are different; I also know good and well that the same thing would have happened if I used Kickstarter or any other fundraising site. The abuse that I deal with online follows me to any space.

Yesterday on Twitter I mentioned that I need a new computer because my computer has been put to work hard for six years of extremely heavy use as a writer and photographer (and for part of it I was in grad school), and it is regularly acting up and near death I suspect. Several awesome Twitter buddies mentioned that I should make a GoFundMe to raise money for one since people are in fact consuming my content and that content won’t exist without a computer. But honestly, I got worried that even making that page might mean the same threats and people trying to get the campaign shut down would happen again. I mean, a Black face asking for a couple of thousand dollars (because I need a certain level of computer as a photographer to mirror what I have now and a cheapo laptop won’t cut it; I am also trying to move, which is expensive as hell, and it is hard to get the computer at the same time as negotiating a move) might mean more assaults on top of the hourly trolling and abuse that I experience online already. Thus, I really don’t know about a new computer fundraising page right now.

Meanwhile, ha ha potato salad. Whatever.

shrineart:

joyfulldreams:

senpaibowie:

etirabys:

skull-bearer:

lolatsjw:

ifonlyfor:

nouveau-brut:

humansofnewyork:

"Two other people took my picture before you, so I was already popular."

I know that some people said in the comments that this outfit was culturally appropriative, but just remember that you don’t know that someone isn’t a POC or biracial just by looking at them. Don’t assume other people’s races. 

^ My immediate reaction was to be upset by this photo because, I’m sorry, I’m just so fucking sick of people stealing Asian outfits and making them cool or trendy. But then I thought that maybe she’s a mixed kid. If not, there’s a problem here, though.

Hi. I’m actually Japanese. Most of us LIKE when people find beauty in our culture. As long as nobody is disrespecting us or making a mockery of us, then there isn’t a problem, and if you think there is, then it seems that you are in favor of cultural segregation and that is causing more harm than good.

When I was in Japan, there were a lot of places where you could get done up in a kimono or the male equivalent and have your picture taken. No one cares.

Most Korean people I know are pretty delighted when foreigners wear hanbok, in a “oh, you are appreciating our culture! you look good in that” way. I have never actually heard or heard of people reacting negatively to non-Korean people wearing traditional Korean clothes, unless they were racist to begin with and would have objected to foreigners regardless of what they were wearing.
'Appropriation' is, I think, only appropriation when either it is done in a blatantly disrespectful way, or if the group whose clothes (etc) are being adopted is culturally marginalized to the degree where they themselves face discrimination when they wear those things.
Korean people, afaik, don’t give a fuck. When foreigners visit and wear our clothes, it’s in good fun by people who are usually appreciative of the aesthetic qualities of what they’re donning, and also because we ourselves have never faced discrimination for our nationality or traditional dress.
uhhh, basically, intent matters, context matters, people within the same community often have radically different ideas of what’s okay. But you know, I think the only Koreans I know who’d potentially care are the American-raised ones on liberal, activisty college campuses who are extremely well versed in the liberal, activisty language and rulebook.

Thank you!!

I also think it makes a difference in that the clothing is, you know, the actual thing and not some vaguely exotic knock-off like most people do with native american clothing. Like this is a legit, actual Kimono. There’s nothing really in the culture OF kimono that has rules about who wears this sort of thing when. Like…kimono literally means “thing you wear”. -shrug-

Bolded some of the things that stood out the most to me.

shrineart:

joyfulldreams:

senpaibowie:

etirabys:

skull-bearer:

lolatsjw:

ifonlyfor:

nouveau-brut:

humansofnewyork:

"Two other people took my picture before you, so I was already popular."

I know that some people said in the comments that this outfit was culturally appropriative, but just remember that you don’t know that someone isn’t a POC or biracial just by looking at them. Don’t assume other people’s races. 

^ My immediate reaction was to be upset by this photo because, I’m sorry, I’m just so fucking sick of people stealing Asian outfits and making them cool or trendy. But then I thought that maybe she’s a mixed kid. If not, there’s a problem here, though.

Hi. I’m actually Japanese. Most of us LIKE when people find beauty in our culture. As long as nobody is disrespecting us or making a mockery of us, then there isn’t a problem, and if you think there is, then it seems that you are in favor of cultural segregation and that is causing more harm than good.
When I was in Japan, there were a lot of places where you could get done up in a kimono or the male equivalent and have your picture taken. No one cares.

Most Korean people I know are pretty delighted when foreigners wear hanbok, in a “oh, you are appreciating our culture! you look good in that” way. I have never actually heard or heard of people reacting negatively to non-Korean people wearing traditional Korean clothes, unless they were racist to begin with and would have objected to foreigners regardless of what they were wearing.

'Appropriation' is, I think, only appropriation when either it is done in a blatantly disrespectful way, or if the group whose clothes (etc) are being adopted is culturally marginalized to the degree where they themselves face discrimination when they wear those things.

Korean people, afaik, don’t give a fuck. When foreigners visit and wear our clothes, it’s in good fun by people who are usually appreciative of the aesthetic qualities of what they’re donning, and also because we ourselves have never faced discrimination for our nationality or traditional dress.

uhhh, basically, intent matters, context matters, people within the same community often have radically different ideas of what’s okay. But you know, I think the only Koreans I know who’d potentially care are the American-raised ones on liberal, activisty college campuses who are extremely well versed in the liberal, activisty language and rulebook.

Thank you!!

I also think it makes a difference in that the clothing is, you know, the actual thing and not some vaguely exotic knock-off like most people do with native american clothing. Like this is a legit, actual Kimono. There’s nothing really in the culture OF kimono that has rules about who wears this sort of thing when. Like…kimono literally means “thing you wear”. -shrug-

Bolded some of the things that stood out the most to me.

lyrangalia:

oakumura:

gnarly-art:

Lilo and Stitch presenting an accurate representation of Hawaiians perspective on luaus held by tourists. 

#what’s sad about this is that this is actually what Hawaiians had to do when the western culture took over #a luau was a sacred practice #until the westerners took the concept and had the audacity to change it into a time to stuff your face with food and put on grass skirts and coconut bras and dance the hula #and when they had these events, they didn’t even let actual Hawaiian people in #so to make money to take care of themselves, the Hawaiians were hired to work in these disgraceful events to clean up after the tourists like slaves only to make less than a buck #so good job disney for doing your fucking research and educating these people #sadly, this still goes on even until today and it makes me sick

"good job disney" my ass, good job CHRIS SANDERS

Let’s not credit just Chris Sanders for this. This happened because they cast actual Hawaiian Actors like Tia Carrere and Jason Scott Lee to play Hawaiian characters, and allowed the actors to have input into writing the characters’ lines. 

This sort of authenticity comes from accuracy and authenticity in casting choices. The fact that Chris Sanders as direct/writer facilitated that does not mean he gets credit for the actors’ experience.

This is why diversity and representation in media matters.

khaleesi:

mexican-mermaid-princess:

filthypolak:

[Graphite] was first discovered in Europe, in Bavaria at the start of the fifteenth century; although the Aztecs had used it as a marker several hundred years earlier.

If the Aztecs used it several hundred years earlier, then it wasn’t first discovered in Europe, was it?

White historical narcicism is mind blowing.

I actually said “what the fuck” out loud

(Source: brainpickings.org)

thepeoplesrecord:

Meet the Native American grandmother who just beat the RedskinsJune 18, 2014
The woman who was the driving force behind the cases that led the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office to cancel the federal trademarks for the Washington Redskins Wednesday is 69-year-old grandmother and longtime Native American activist, Suzan Harjo. 
"Suzan has been fighting this since 1992. Native American people have been fighting this since 1972. … The reason it has come up recently is because Suzan has worked really hard to bring this in the public eye," Amanda Blackhorse, one of the five Native American plaintiffs in the case filed before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, told Business Insider.
"She’s just a tremendous woman. She’s a strong Native American woman, and I’m so happy to have met her and to have been a part of all this because this is what we need to do," Blackhorse added. 
Harjo was born in Oklahoma and is of Cheyenne and Muscogee ancestry. In a conversation with Business Insider shortly after the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office’s decision was announced, Harjo said she became involved with political activism while she was still in school.
"One time when I was in school, I was selected by our Cheyenne leadership to come to Washington with them. And when my family asked, ‘Why do you want her to go?’ They said, ‘Because she talks good and she ain’t afraid of nobody.’ So, those became resumé items," Harjo recounted. 
In high school, Harjo was inspired to fight against what she describes as “racist stereotypes in American sports” because of an Oklahoma Native American activist named Clyde Warrior.
"He made a personal cause of getting rid of the mascot ‘Little Red’ at the University of Oklahoma," Harjo said of Warrior. "Most of the Indians in Oklahoma couldn’t stand ‘Little Red’ and we called him the dancing idiot. He was always portrayed by a white guy in Indian costume."
Little Red was eventually banished by University of Oklahoma President J. Herbert Hollomon in 1970.
According to Harjo, activists involved in the effort to eliminate Native American mascots always viewed the Washington Redskins football team as “the worst” offender.
"No matter where you went or what was the mascot fight of the moment in any locale, everyone would always say, ‘And the worst one is right there in the nation’s capital, the Washington team name,’" said Harjo. "It was the worst one, everyone pointed to it."
Harjo moved to Washington D.C. in 1974. Soon after her arrival, she said someone gave her and her husband tickets to a Redskins game.
"We’re football fans and we can separate the team name from the game, so we went to a game. And we didn’t stay for the game at all, because people started — someone said something, ‘Are you this or that?’ So, we started to answer, then people started like pulling our hair," explained Harjo. "And they would call us that name and it was very weird for us. So, we just left and never went to another game."
Harjo said her experience at the Redskins game “solidified” her opposition to stereotypical Native American sports mascots.
"That just solidified it for me because it wasn’t just namecalling, it was what the name had promoted," Harjo said. "That’s the example of what objectification is. You strip the person of humanity and they’re just an object and you can do anything.
You can pull their hair! I wouldn’t even touch someone else!”
Harjo, who eventually became the first president of the Morning Star Institute, a D.C.-based national Native rights organization, began looking for ways to change the Redskins name. She said she settled on the strategy of trying to get the team’s trademark canceled after she was contacted by a Minneapolis lawyer named Stephen Baird in 1992. 
According to Harjo, Baird was working on a law review article about his theory the Redskins’ trademark could be canceled based on a section of the U.S. Trademark Act prohibiting trademarks that “may disparage … persons, living or dead, institutions, beliefs, or national symbols.” Harjo said Baird heard she had “looked at all sorts of causes of action, and not settled on any of them, and had been talking with various attorneys about ways that we could approach this.” When Baird called her, Harjo said his “first question” was why she rejected using the Patent and Trademark Office as a forum to fight the Redskins name.
"And I said, ‘I have no idea what you’re talking about,’" Harjo remembered with a laugh. "Once he explained his theory, I was so intrigued by his theory. It was very different from the kinds of things we’d been looking at. … It didn’t interfere with free speech, it wasn’t even forcing a decision. What it’s saying is, ‘Here’s what the federal government will or will not sanction.’ Because, it’s the federal government’s role to grant the exclusive privilege of making money off this name."
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

Meet the Native American grandmother who just beat the Redskins
June 18, 2014

The woman who was the driving force behind the cases that led the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office to cancel the federal trademarks for the Washington Redskins Wednesday is 69-year-old grandmother and longtime Native American activist, Suzan Harjo. 

"Suzan has been fighting this since 1992. Native American people have been fighting this since 1972. … The reason it has come up recently is because Suzan has worked really hard to bring this in the public eye," Amanda Blackhorse, one of the five Native American plaintiffs in the case filed before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, told Business Insider.

"She’s just a tremendous woman. She’s a strong Native American woman, and I’m so happy to have met her and to have been a part of all this because this is what we need to do," Blackhorse added. 

Harjo was born in Oklahoma and is of Cheyenne and Muscogee ancestry. In a conversation with Business Insider shortly after the U.S. Patents and Trademarks Office’s decision was announced, Harjo said she became involved with political activism while she was still in school.

"One time when I was in school, I was selected by our Cheyenne leadership to come to Washington with them. And when my family asked, ‘Why do you want her to go?’ They said, ‘Because she talks good and she ain’t afraid of nobody.’ So, those became resumé items," Harjo recounted. 

In high school, Harjo was inspired to fight against what she describes as “racist stereotypes in American sports” because of an Oklahoma Native American activist named Clyde Warrior.

"He made a personal cause of getting rid of the mascot ‘Little Red’ at the University of Oklahoma," Harjo said of Warrior. "Most of the Indians in Oklahoma couldn’t stand ‘Little Red’ and we called him the dancing idiot. He was always portrayed by a white guy in Indian costume."

Little Red was eventually banished by University of Oklahoma President J. Herbert Hollomon in 1970.

According to Harjo, activists involved in the effort to eliminate Native American mascots always viewed the Washington Redskins football team as “the worst” offender.

"No matter where you went or what was the mascot fight of the moment in any locale, everyone would always say, ‘And the worst one is right there in the nation’s capital, the Washington team name,’" said Harjo. "It was the worst one, everyone pointed to it."

Harjo moved to Washington D.C. in 1974. Soon after her arrival, she said someone gave her and her husband tickets to a Redskins game.

"We’re football fans and we can separate the team name from the game, so we went to a game. And we didn’t stay for the game at all, because people started — someone said something, ‘Are you this or that?’ So, we started to answer, then people started like pulling our hair," explained Harjo. "And they would call us that name and it was very weird for us. So, we just left and never went to another game."

Harjo said her experience at the Redskins game “solidified” her opposition to stereotypical Native American sports mascots.

"That just solidified it for me because it wasn’t just namecalling, it was what the name had promoted," Harjo said. "That’s the example of what objectification is. You strip the person of humanity and they’re just an object and you can do anything.

You can pull their hair! I wouldn’t even touch someone else!”

Harjo, who eventually became the first president of the Morning Star Institute, a D.C.-based national Native rights organization, began looking for ways to change the Redskins name. She said she settled on the strategy of trying to get the team’s trademark canceled after she was contacted by a Minneapolis lawyer named Stephen Baird in 1992. 

According to Harjo, Baird was working on a law review article about his theory the Redskins’ trademark could be canceled based on a section of the U.S. Trademark Act prohibiting trademarks that “may disparage … persons, living or dead, institutions, beliefs, or national symbols.” Harjo said Baird heard she had “looked at all sorts of causes of action, and not settled on any of them, and had been talking with various attorneys about ways that we could approach this.” When Baird called her, Harjo said his “first question” was why she rejected using the Patent and Trademark Office as a forum to fight the Redskins name.

"And I said, ‘I have no idea what you’re talking about,’" Harjo remembered with a laugh. "Once he explained his theory, I was so intrigued by his theory. It was very different from the kinds of things we’d been looking at. … It didn’t interfere with free speech, it wasn’t even forcing a decision. What it’s saying is, ‘Here’s what the federal government will or will not sanction.’ Because, it’s the federal government’s role to grant the exclusive privilege of making money off this name."

Full article

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

lyndez:

jcoleknowsbest:

sourcedumal:

tashabilities:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

cryseis:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

exoticwaves:

we’re such assholes in the US omg

if there was a POC country on the other side the white europeans would be pulling the same shit. or have we been ignoring the rise of the right and the general racist climate of europe. who teh hell you think the white americans descended from?

*cough cough*


I present the border between Spain and Morocco, aka Europe and Africa…

quite.

Boop

Welp

*sips tea*

http://media.economist.com/images/20090530/2209AM2.jpg
IM ON MOBILE BUT LOOK AT THE BORDER BETWEEN THE USA AND CANADA

lyndez:

jcoleknowsbest:

sourcedumal:

tashabilities:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

cryseis:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

exoticwaves:

we’re such assholes in the US omg

if there was a POC country on the other side the white europeans would be pulling the same shit. or have we been ignoring the rise of the right and the general racist climate of europe. who teh hell you think the white americans descended from?

*cough cough*

the border between Spain and Morocco

I present the border between Spain and Morocco, aka Europe and Africa…

quite.

Boop

Welp

*sips tea*

http://media.economist.com/images/20090530/2209AM2.jpg

IM ON MOBILE BUT LOOK AT THE BORDER BETWEEN THE USA AND CANADA

(Source: peterfromtexas)